Saturday, March 23, 2013

Sector 7 by David Wiesner





Genre:  Fantasy


Year Published: 1999


Year Read:  2010

Publisher:  Clarion Books


“Sector 7” is a Caldecott Honor book from the creative mind of David Wiesner and it is about how a young boy meets a mischievous little cloud during his class field trip to see the Empire State Building and when they separated from the boy’s class, the cloud and the boy ended up having wild adventures together in Sector 7!  “Sector 7” is truly one of the most memorable wordless picture books ever created that children will love for many years!

Is there nothing more grand that David Wiesner can not do with wordless picture books?  Well, “Sector 7” has certainly proven the master illustrating skills that David Wiesner possess and is well known for!  David Wiesner’s illustrations alone tell the story of the adventures that the boy and the mischievous little cloud have together at Sector 7.  I love the way that David Wiesner illustrates the boy in having a brown waistcoat and a red hat with a red scarf, which sort of makes him look like Little Pete from “The Adventures of Pete and Pete” (I am a huge Nickelodeon fanatic which is why I usually love to compare various characters from certain books with Nickelodeon characters!). 

I also love the way that David Wiesner brings a strong fantasy element to the story as Sector 7 is located in the sky and supports itself on small windmills on each side of the factory which makes it look like the castle in “Howl’s Moving Castle.”

The images that truly stood out the most for me were the images of the clouds themselves, both the humanized clouds and the real clouds in the sky.  I truly love the scene where the boy and the little cloud are flying through the air and the clouds are slightly light brown and look so stretched out and gorgeous that you can actually feel yourself flying through the air yourself!  I also loved the interior of Sector 7 as it looks likes the inside of a train station as there is a large bulletin board at the top of the station that tells the arrivals and departures of different types of clouds.  I also loved the idea that David Wiesner makes the story take place in New York City, since I have been to New York City myself, but I have not really been to the Empire State Building, so it was truly interesting to see the Empire State Building in David Wiesner’s magical world!

All in all, “Sector 7” is definitely a book that every child should read, especially for children who cannot read yet, but love looking at illustrations of many different children’s books.  This book is truly one of the most memorable wordless picture books ever made next to Raymond Brigg’s classic “The Snowman” and I definitely think that many children will enjoy this book since the illustrations are truly beautiful and engaging to look at!  I would recommend this book to children ages four and up since there is nothing inappropriate in this book that would cause parents concern.

* 1999 New York City Book Award for Children's Book
* 2000 An ALA Notable Children's Book for Younger Readers
* 2000 Book Sense Book of the Year Honor Book for Children
* 2000 Caldecott Honor




No comments:

Post a Comment